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THE HUMAN RIGHTS CENTRE UGANDA

Defending Human Rights Defenders


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The passing of the Anti-Terrorism (Amendment) Act, 2015

Posted On: 19 Oct 2015

The passing of the Anti-Terrorism (Amendment) Act, 2015

Introduction

The Anti-Terrorism Amendment Act was passed by Parliament on 19 June 2015. This article discusses the Anti-Terrorism Amendment Act in light of its: importance; the procedure followed in passing it; andits implications including human rights considerations. It also makes recommendations for improvements in the legislative process.

Importance of the Act

The Amendment Act was important for various reasons. The Amendment Act had the objective of amending the Anti-terrorism Act 2002 to: redefine acts of terrorism including terrorism financing; giving the Minister of Internal Affairs powers to implement the Act; and to provide for the expeditious freezing, seizure and forfeiture of assets and property suspected to be read more...


 
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TO AMMEND OR NOT TO AMMEND THE UGANDAN CONSTITUTION; ISSUES RAISED BY VARIOUS PROPONETS.

Posted On: 02 Apr 2015

The cabinet of Uganda is considering amending the 1995 Constitution. A cabinet subcommittee chaired by the Prime Minister Hon. Amama Mbabazi is working on the proposed amendments which include; providing for an Independent Electoral Commission, limiting the age of the Electoral Commissioners, to stipulate grounds for recalling Members of Parliament (MPs), to establish a Salaries Commission and; to give more statutory powers to the President. There is also a proposal that parliament establishes a special court to hear cases related to  terrorism. The government also seeks to  introduce  a new article  specifying  grounds of refusal  to approve a presidential nominee  ‘to emphasize that  unless  a nominee  is not qualified the president  should be trusted  to make read more...


 
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OBSERVER STATUS WITH THE AFRICAN COMMISSION ON HUMAN AND PEOPLE'S RIGHTS

Posted On: 08 Jan 2014

What is Observer Status?

Simply put, Observer status is a privilege granted by some organizations to non-members to give them an ability to participate in the organization's activities. Observer status is often granted by intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) to non-member organizations and international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) that have an interest in the IGO's activities. Observers generally have a limited ability to participate in the IGO, lacking the ability to vote or propose resolutions.

The African Commission on Human and People's Rights (ACHPR) is one such entity that may grant observer status to certain organizations.  The Commission is a mechanism established in October 1987 with Headquarters in Banjul, the Gambia and tasked with read more...


 
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MAKING THE TRANSITION: ENGAGING COMMUNITIES IN UGANDA WITH THE UNITED NATIONS ON DECLARATION ON HUMAN RIGHTS DEFENDERS

Posted On: 08 Oct 2013

Jacqueline Kasoma ( jkasoma@hrcug.orgjkasoma@hrcug.org) is the Head of Programmes at the Human Rights Centre Uganda (HRCU); she designed and was in overall charge of the project which is the subject of this policy and practice note. Jamie Hitchen ( j.c.hitchen@gmail.comj.c.hitchen@gmail.com) has worked on governance and human rights issues in India, Uganda and Sierra Leone; in the course of his research assessing the situation facing human rights defenders in Uganda he observed four of the six community translations.

Abstract

The UN Declaration on human rights defenders was designed to promote and protect the rights of individuals read more...


 
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Blog

  • By: jose
    UN expert hails role of equality bodies and action plans in combating racism: NEW YORK / GENEVA (2 November 2016) – States should maximize the use of specialized equality bodies and national action plans to tackle racism and xenophobia, a United Nations human rights expert has said. Using these tools was key to identifying the causes and shaping new policies, said the Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, Mutuma Ruteere. “National specialized bodies and national action plans address the root causes of discrimination in areas such as employment, housing, education, the justice system, law enforcement and access to different goods and services,” Mr. Ruteree said, presenting a report* to the UN General Assembly. “They also drive change in State and private organizations Read the Special Rapporteur’s report: http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/71/325

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