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THE HUMAN RIGHTS CENTRE UGANDA

Defending Human Rights Defenders


Public Order Management Act

HRC Defenders Uganda

 

The Public Order Order Management Act, 2013 (POMA) is a law that provides for the regulation of public meetings. The POMA provides for the duties and responsibilities of the police, organizers and participants in relation to public meetings. This law also prescribes measures for safeguarding public order and for related matters.

For any comments please email us on info@hrcug.org or bbunya@hrcug.org

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The Anti – Pornography Act, 2014

HRC Defenders Uganda

 

The Anti – Pornography Act, 2014

An act to define and create the offence of pornography; to provide for the prohibition of pornography; to establish the Pornography Control Committee and prescribe its functions; and for other related matters.

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The prevention and prohibition of torture act, 2012

HRC Defenders Uganda

 

The prevention and prohibition of torture act, 2012

An Act to give effect, in accordance with Article 24 and 44(a) of the constitution, to the respect of human dignity and protection from inhuman treatment by prohibiting and preventing any form of torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; to provide for the crime of torture; to give effect to the obligations of Uganda as a State Party to the United Nation’s Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and other related matters

For any comment email us on info@hrcug.org / bbunya@hrcug.org

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THE TEN CRITICAL HUMAN RIGHTS CHALLENGES

HRC Defenders Uganda

 

The Government of Uganda is committed to the promotion and protection of human rights in Uganda as illustrated by: the provisions in the constitution and other laws; the ratification of international and regional human rights instruments for human rights protection and the establishment of the Uganda Human Rights Commission and the Equal Opportunities Commission, among other things

The Human Rights Centre-Uganda and its partners have identified 10 critical human rights challenges that should be addressed by Parliament in order to enhance human rights protection in Uganda.

  1. Lack of Respect for Rule of Law
  2. Insufficient attention to economic, social and cultural rights
  3. Violations of fundamental freedoms of opinion, expression, assembly and association
  4. Rampant Corruption
  5. High Unemployment rate
  6. Torture and ill treatment
  7.  Sexual and Gender Based Violence
  8.  Inadequate civic education
  9.  Human Trafficking
  10. Narrowing Space for Civil Society work 

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Guide

HRC Defenders Uganda

 

Human rights belong to all Ugandans, and it is the duty of the Executive, Legislature and Judiciary to protect and enforce those rights. The Committee on Human Rights in Parliament was created in July 2012. It has a mandate which is dedicated to human rights.It is important in a democracy to ensure that there is justice and all rights are defended, and that is what is expected of this Committee.The Committee will be charged with monitoring Government’s observance of human rights. The mandate has already been defined by Rule 174 of the Rules of Procedure of Parliament and the Members of Parliament serving on the Committee are expected to adhere to it. This booklet explains to the people of Uganda what the Committee on Human Rights is, its importance and its functions.

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Uganda - The Management of Elections 2010

 

Uganda - The Management of Elections 2010

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Blog

  • By: jose
    UN expert hails role of equality bodies and action plans in combating racism: NEW YORK / GENEVA (2 November 2016) – States should maximize the use of specialized equality bodies and national action plans to tackle racism and xenophobia, a United Nations human rights expert has said. Using these tools was key to identifying the causes and shaping new policies, said the Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, Mutuma Ruteere. “National specialized bodies and national action plans address the root causes of discrimination in areas such as employment, housing, education, the justice system, law enforcement and access to different goods and services,” Mr. Ruteree said, presenting a report* to the UN General Assembly. “They also drive change in State and private organizations Read the Special Rapporteur’s report: http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/71/325

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